Foreign Policy

Will you work for an independent foreign policy? Are you in favor of the abrogation of the Visiting Forces Agreement and other unequal military agreements? Will you put a stop to US and other troops’ permanent presence on Philippine territory?  Will you keep the anti-bases and nuke-free provisions in the Philippine Constitution?

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From 2001-2010, US$384 million in direct military aid from the United States (US) aside from at least US$400 in “socioeconomic aid” spent in communities to support the US military presence. (US State Department)

Since 2002 up to 500 US Special Forces personnel have been permanently deployed in Mindanao in a “forward operating base”, supported and participated in combat operations, as well as built fixed facilities.

Over 50,000 US soldiers have come into the country to Albay, Basilan, Batanes, Capiz, Cavite, Cebu, Ilocos Sur, Nueva Ecija, Laguna, Leyte, Masbate, Palawan, Pampanga, Bataan, Sorsogon, Sulu, Tarlac, Quezon and Zamboanga for large military “exercises” such as the annual Balikatan. Aside from these are scores of other smaller exercises – with for instance 163 exercises just in 2008 – and concealed operations. (IBON monitoring)

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Benigno “Noynoy” Cojuangco Aquino Jr.

Liberal Party

  • Favors the US military presence in the country and supports a review of the US-RP Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) towards changing provisions to ensure that it continues.

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John Carlos “JC” Gordon Delos Reyes

Ang Kapatiran Party

  • Says that he is against the US military presence in Mindanao and that the VFA can be reviewed.
  • Platform declares “[pursuing] peace based on love, justice, reconciliation, active nonviolence and progressive disarmament.”

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Joseph “Erap” Ejercito Estrada

Partido ng Masang Pilipino

  • As president, has no record of working for an independent foreign policy. The controversial VFA was ratified during his administration.

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Richard Juico “Dick” Gordon

Bagumbayan-Volunteers for a New Philippines (B.BAYAN-VNP)

  • Fully supports the VFA and wants greater cooperation with the US military, although says that the US should respect the jurisdiction of the Philippines especially on custodial issues.
  • Campaigned for the US military bases to remain in 1991.

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Maria Ana Consuelo “Jamby” Madrigal-Valade

Independent

  • Platform declares keeping the Philippines free from foreign military intrusion and nuclear weapons, stopping the interference of foreign military forces, and repealing the Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA), Mutual Logistics Support Agreement (MLSA) and the Military Assistance Pact.

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Nicanor Jesus “Nicky” Pineda Perlas III

Independent

  • Has expressed concern about possible constitutional violations of the continued presence of US troops.
  • Believes that the country can enter into principled partnerships with foreign countries for the development of its resources as long as the rights of the Philippines are recognized and respected.

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Gilberto Eduardo Gerardo ”Gibo” Cojuangco Teodoro, Jr

Lakas ng Tao-Kabalikat ng Malayang Pilipino (LAKAS-KAMPI)

  • Fully supports deeper RP-US military relations and argues that these bring great benefits.
  • Avid defender of the VFA, from his time as defense secretary, and says that the country should even have more VFAs or Status of Forces Agreements (SOFA) with other countries.

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Eduardo “Eddie” Cruz Villanueva

Bangon Pilipinas (BP)

  • Favors the VFA “as long as the VFA is helping our soldiers” and the Philippine government has custody over American soldiers committing crimes in the country.
  • Wants to provide an independent framework of foreign policies defined by what is best for Filipinos.

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Manuel “Manny” Bamba Villar Jr.

Nacionalista Party

  • Believes that the VFA should be reviewed as well as other unequal economic, military and other foreign treaties.
  • Platform promises to chart a foreign policy based on respect for national sovereignty and ensuring mutual benefit.
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